Significant drop in Placer and Nevada Counties

Auburn, Calif. – The annual Point-in-Time survey of people experiencing homelessness in Placer and Nevada counties was conducted on Jan. 24 to determine where people experiencing homelessness stayed the night of Jan. 23 and continued by street outreach teams through Feb.1.

The survey count was conducted by 135 local volunteers, nonprofits, and city and county staff.

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How many people are homeless in Placer County?

The 2024 count of sheltered and unsheltered individuals surveyed at least 702 individuals experiencing homelessness in Placer County and at least 516 individuals experiencing homelessness in Nevada County. The count surveyed 366 unsheltered individuals in Placer County and 258 unsheltered individuals in Nevada County.

Downward trend continues

By comparison, the 2023 count surveyed a minimum of 709 individuals experiencing homelessness in Placer County and 492 people experiencing homelessness in Nevada County.

Homeless Resource Council of the Sierras

This effort was led by the Homeless Resource Council of the Sierras (HRCS), the lead organization in the region’s Continuum of Care for Homelessness. HRCS is a nonprofit collaborative comprised of members representing nonprofit and government agencies who coordinate resources and develop strategies to end homelessness in Placer and Nevada counties. A Point-in-Time (PIT) count is a one-night estimate of both sheltered in emergency shelter or transitional housing; or unsheltered on the street, in a camp, in a tent, in a vehicle or in some other place unfit for human habitation, on the night of the count. The PIT count, a requirement of the United States Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD), was made possible in part by generous financial support from Anthem, Kaiser Permanente, California Health and Wellness, and Partnership HealthPlan.

“The data collected each year during the PIT count helps assess the needs of individuals and families experiencing homelessness as it drives the types of programs offered, steers funding allocations, and assists the community in better serving our unhoused neighbors. Each number in this count represents an individual or a family who is struggling to find and secure safe housing as well as other services so they can remain housed,” said JoLyn McMillan, Executive Director of the Homeless Resource Council of the Sierras. For example, surveyors connected with a mother with 4 children who was experiencing homelessness for the first time and worried about how to care for her children. Another 38 children under 13 were experiencing homelessness with their families on the night of the count. PIT counts do not include a broader McKinney-Vento definition used by K-12 education systems, which includes people and families who are ‘doubling up’ with others.

Veterans, families, youth

The 2024 PIT count in Placer County identified 45 veterans, 29 unaccompanied youth/ young adults (ages 15-24 years), and 36 families who were experiencing homelessness. Of the total surveyed, 42% reported having a physical disability and 60% reported living with a mental illness. In Nevada County there were 14 veterans identified as homeless, 11 unaccompanied youth/young adults (ages 15-24 years), and 34 families. Of the total surveyed, 42% reported having a physical disability and 54% reported living with a mental illness.

Of adults who responded to survey questions in the 2024 PIT count, 261 individuals in Placer County and 181 individuals in Nevada County identified as chronically homeless. People experiencing chronic homelessness are living with mental illness, substance use disorders, physical disabilities, or other medical conditions; and have been unhoused for one year currently or repeatedly over the last three years.

“Permanent supportive housing is key to assisting those struggling in chronic homelessness. We continue to work toward developing enough supportive and affordable housing inventory to assist with bringing individuals out of homelessness and into housing.”

JoLyn McMillan, Executive Director HRCS

Homeless individuals wishing to access the basic shelter and housing services in Placer and Nevada Counties should call 2-1-1 to be connected to services.

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